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History Of Math Research Papers

Historia Mathematica publishes historical scholarship on mathematics and its development in all cultures and time periods. In particular, the journal encourages informed studies on mathematicians and their work in historical context, on the histories of institutions and organizations supportive of the mathematical endeavor, on historiographical topics in the history of mathematics, and on the interrelations between mathematical ideas, science, and the broader culture.

In addition to research articles, Historia Mathematica also publishes book reviews, abstracts of the current literature in the history of mathematics, notes and sources, and occasionally letters to the editor.

Research Areas Include:

Historiography
• Interrelations between mathematics and the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, arts, religion, and education
• Mathematicians and their work in context
• Organizations and institutions
• Pure and applied mathematical developments
Sociology of mathematics

This journal has an Open Archive. All published items, including research articles, have unrestricted access and will remain permanently free to read and download 48 months after publication. All papers in the Archive are subject to Elsevier's user license.

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The Horologion of Andronikos Kyrrhestes (official name of the monument), is a structure about 14 m tall and 8 m in diameter. It is an octagonal building, which incorporates a cylindrical structure on the south side. At the top of the... more

The Horologion of Andronikos Kyrrhestes (official name of the monument), is a structure about 14 m tall and 8 m in diameter. It is an octagonal building, which incorporates a cylindrical structure on the south side. At the top of the eight vertical walls is a vaulted ceiling depicting the sky. Incised lines on the exterior of the eight sides of the edifice show that there once existed this number of sundials. Τhe building has two propyla (gate buildings) and rests on a three-stepped base (crepidoma). It is a particularly remarkable and unusual ancient Greek building, made of Pentelic marble. The name of this, the most important architectural masterpiece of the late Hellenistic period, is derived from the name of its manufacturer, Andronikos Kyrrhestes (Stuart & Revett, 1762; Noble & Price, 1968: 345). It is supposed that this great Greek astronomer, engineer and architect was also the sponsor for the construction of the monument (Wycherley, 1978: 103; Kienast, 2013: 28). The octagonal tower served as an astronomical and weather forecasting station (Vitruvius De Architectura I.6.4, Marcus Terentius Varro Rerum rusticarum libri III, 5, 9-17). The astronomical monument is also called The Tower of the Winds or Aerides (from the Greek word Αέρηδες which means winds) or Temple of Aeolus (Aeolus is the ancient Greek god of winds).
In the upper part of its exterior surface is a frieze with eight personified wind deities, one on each of the sides (Fig. 2). The wind deities are: Boreas (N), Kaikias (NE), Apeliotes (E), Eurus (SE), Notus (S), Lips (SW), Zephyrus (W), and Skiron (NW)......(more in the article)

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