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Pumpkin Carving Easy Outlines For Essays

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Wink, wink!

 

Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.comHere's a pumpkin carving pattern your neighbors will LOL over: an emoticon-friendly face. And best of all? This text-worthy pumpkin pattern is simple enough for even beginners to carve.




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Cat's whiskers

Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.comThis purrfectly cute pumpkin carving stencil isn't hard to create at home. You can skip the whiskers if your knife skills aren't up to the job.




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Casper the Friendly Ghost

Not too scary for little ones, this template is mostly curved lines, making it easier for pumpkin carving novices.

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Starry night

Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.comYou and Van Gogh: This stencil offers a cool, twinkly evening scene that's different than the usual Jack. Feel free to mix up where the stars go, based on where your pumpkin's flattest (easiest to carve).

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Hiss!

More for an expert hand, this pumpkin carving template requires a steady knife to make sure that the cat's feet and tail don't separate from the base. If you slip, you can always "piece" it back together with toothpicks.

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R.I.P.

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comSpooky gravestones are not hard to cut out, but they make a creepy jack-o'-lantern nonetheless.

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Goofy grin

Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.comWatch for the eyes and teeth when you're carving out this pumpkin template: The squares and circles are tricky if your knife is larger. Switch to a smaller blade for the detail work if you need.

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Devilish fun

Tatiana Ayazo/Rd.comThis pumpkin carving template is more for the pros: Use a sharp, thin knife blade to trim away all the curls.

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WHO stole the candy?

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comWhoo-whoo wants to make a different jack o'lantern this year? You do, with this easy, wide-image stencil.

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Death's head

Start with the quirky eyebrows first, then work your way down the face for an easier pumpkin carving experience.

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Happy Jack

If you're a little rusty in your pumpkin carving skills, try cutting out the entire triangle for eyes and half-circle for the mouth; you can always cut in eyeballs and teeth and spear them in with toothpicks.

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Calling all witches

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comStart slowly by lightly tracing the outline of the witch with your knife; then go around again and cut deeper into the pumpkin, to outline the figure in the template.

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Haunted house

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comThis silly, almost human house will cast creepy shadows on the wall. If you're unsure of your pumpkin carving skills, you can skip the extra cuts for the roof and simplify the entire template.

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Ghastly ghost

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comPumpkin carving pros: Take it to the next level by adding an open-mouth scream to this eerie ghost template.

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Creepy crawly

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comBlack widow: Trace the outline of the spider's body with your knife, then use a thinner, sharp knife to really etch out the eight legs.

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Gone batty

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comYou'll be done with this pumpkin stencil in no time with its easy-to-carve pattern. Great for kids to help, and you can make more than one bat if your surface is large enough.

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Death wish

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comWatch for the tiny pieces between the skull top and bottom, and the bridge of the nose; you'll want to carve the pumpkin carefully in those connecting spaces. A smaller paring knife might work well there.

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Sweet treat

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comWhat a treat! A pumpkin carving template that's sure to please any kid; just watch for the spacing between scoops, which can be hard for beginners to get right.

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Eerie tree

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comOnce you get the base down, you can go free-form with the branches, letting the surface of your pumpkin be your guide to carving it.

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Ominous raven

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comThis creepy bird pattern can also be replicated in multiple times around the pumpkin, making for a very Hitchcock "The Birds" decoration. Amazing when lit.

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All the candy

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comTrick or treat! Put this pumpkin out on the porch if yours is the house that's giving out the best candy.

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Boo moons

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comDo we have to spell it out for you? This pumpkin carving template makes for one silly jack o'lantern.

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Joy ride

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comGot kids who love cars? This pumpkin template ought to drive them over the edge of happiness.

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A little nutty

Tatiana Ayazo /Rd.comFall is in the air with this festive pumpkin template, which is easy to knock out in minutes.




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More: DecoratingHalloween

[en español]

DLTK's Crafts for Kids
Pumpkin Carving Patterns

Contributed by Leanne Guenther

Well, I love letting the girls design their perfect triangular eyed and one-tooth mouthed pumpkins but as they get older they're starting to want fancier designs on their Halloween masterpieces.  While you can muddle through some of the simpler designs with serrated knives, tablespoons and a small nail, you'll be well served investing in some pumpkin carving tools if you plan on attempting some of the more detailed designs.  Pumpkin carving sets are quite easy to find at the right time of year at your local Walmart-type store, home and garden store or even on-line.

These are not intended as cut and paste paper crafts -- check out our Jack-o'-Lantern Faces instead.

Materials:

  • pumpkin,
  • printer,
  • paper,
  • spoon or pumpkin scoop,
  • small nail or pumpkin poker,
  • serrated knife or pumpkin saw (the more complicated the pattern, the more you're going to want a pumpkin saw).

Instructions:

  • Prepare your pumpkin by:
    • Cut a hole in the top for the lid.  Make sure you angle the saw inwards so your lid sits on top of the pumpkin and doesn't just fall through
    • Scoop out the seeds and strings with a spoon
    • Scrape some of the flesh from the inside so your pumpkin is about an inch thick all the way around (or at least wherever you'll be carving).  You can poke  a straight pin through it to estimate the thickness.
  • Print out the pattern.
     
    There are two types of patterns.  Some require you to cut the character out of the pumpkin.  Other patterns, like Blue's Clues, use the leftover pumpkin to represent the pattern and you cut out the background to make the character look back lit.  Generally speaking, the patterns like Blue's Clues are easier to make because there is less fine cutting.
  • Trim off excess paper
  • Tape or use pins to affix the pattern to the pumpkin.
  • If your pumpkin is quite lumpy, dip the paper in water or vegetable oil (the oil will make printer ink run less, but makes the project quite slippery).  Darren likes oil, I like water -- I wonder what that says about our marriage?
    • Smooth the pattern onto the pumpkin, affix with pins or masking tape and let the paper dry.
    • You can also make small cuts in the paper where it bunches so it lies flat on the pumpkin.  Add pins or tape to hold.
  • Poke holes through the pattern with a nail, push pin or pumpkin poker.  Make the holes about 1/8th inch apart (or even closer for more complicated patterns).  This step can take quite awhile so be patient.  Just place the pumpkin in your lap and work away at it.
  • Remove the paper from the pumpkin.
  • Optional:  Rub flour or chalk dust all over the part where you poked the holes so you can see them better.
  • Push a nail through the pumpkin skin where you want to start carving.
    • Turn and push until it's all the way into the pumpkin, then remove.
    • Repeat anywhere you're going to need to start carving (eyes, nose, etc).
    • You want to do all the pushing before you start carving because it take some pressure (once you start carving, the pumpkin becomes weaker and applying pressure may cause it to break)
  • Using your nail hole as a starting point, cut the design with your serrated knife or saw. 
    • start somewhere in the center of the design to keep from putting too much pressure on areas already carved
    • Use a sawing motion to cut out your design, using very light pressure… take your time and allow the sawing to do the work rather than applying pressure and forcing it.
  • When making curves, just slightly turn the saw.  When making sharp corners, remove the saw and re-insert it at an angle.
  • To remove pieces, push them out from the inside. For larger pieces, you may want to cut them into smaller bits and remove them in pieces.
  • Once your pumpkin is all set, use a pumpkin light (safer than a candle) or a candle in a candleholder designed for pumpkins to light it up.
    • Light the candle and place it on a piece of aluminum foil inside the pumpkin.  Put the lid on.  Let it sit a minute
    • Remove the lid and there should be a smoke mark on it
    • Cut a vent in the lid where the smoke mark shows

Click here for instructions with photos >

Click here for instructions with photos >

 

Printable version of these instructions

 

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